Five New Fishing Quotations and Sayings: 24 July 2014

Here we go again, five new pithy and fishy quotations and saying, bringing the total up to 1210.

“Celebrity chefs are the leaders in the field of food, and we are the led. Why should the leaders of chemical businesses be held responsible for polluting the marine environment with a few grams of effluent, which is sub-lethal to marine species, while celebrity chefs are turning out endangered fish at several dozen tables a night without enduring a syllable of criticism?”

– Charles Clover

“Fish,” he said softly, aloud, “I’ll stay with you until I am dead.”

– Ernest Hemingway

“It takes a man who is a thinker. To catch the big one, hook, line and sinker!”

NA

“Floods of humanity, lakes of peace, rivers of gold, the tides of war; all we are and do is linked to the water of life.”

– David Mead

“As with a faint star in the night’s sky, one can better understand fishing’s allure by looking around it, off to the side, not right at it”

Holly Morris

See all 1210 Fishing quotations and sayings…

The ‘UK Grip’ – A Trout Killer Too!

badgripuk

Some people who read my recent article on ‘grip and kill’ when taking photos of trout have pointed out the style of grip shown above – I call it the ‘UK grip’ and it can be lethal.

Those who follow UK trout fishing magazines and websites may have noticed the prevalence of photos with the trout being held as seen in the photo above. I did a quick flick through a pile of recent top selling UK magazines and websites and as rough estimate well over 50% of fish are held by the UK grip.  I believe trout are held this way to show off the fact that the fish is a ‘full-finned’ or wild fish, not a stocked fish.

Many (most?) stocked fish have their tails and fines damaged by other fish and the concrete walls of the stock pens. So to show off the fact the fish is ‘full-finned and tailed’ you need a grip that does just that. That grip which I have called the ‘UK grip’ is great for showing fins and tails, but is it good for the trout? No.

The UK grip means that the tail of the fish is not firmly held by fingers encircling the base of the tail – to do so would ‘hide’ the tail. So the holder must squeeze the fish as shown above. If the fish thrashes about the grip around the heart area has to increase. All bad news for the heart and other organs.

This practice needs to stop, and fishing media can stamp it out almost immediately. Magazines and websites need to stop showing fish held in this way.

Trout Dying To Get a Good Photo

We all should know the rules for releasing a trout with the best chance of survival, but there is one rule that is almost never included in articles about successful releasing.

So, you have landed the fish as quickly as possible to limit capture stress and you are about to pick up the fish and a get a few ‘grip and grin’ shots before release.

But, grip and grin, can all too often turn into grip and kill, and it is all down to where you grip, and how you grip, the trout that can determine its survival.

Link corrected – Read the full story and see the grip and kill photos.

The worst example of ‘grip and kill’ in these shots – almost certain lethal damage to heart, liver and gills. Photo of worst grip and kill grip

Manta Rays Last Dance?

Spectacular imagery, featuring giant Pacific mantas and professional mermaid-model Hannah Fraser.

During her many breath-hold dives, which often lasted a minute or more, Fraser had one ankle anchored to the sea floor with 50 pounds of weights, which enabled her to sway with the current, 30 feet beneath the surface.

New Tagging Research Reveals Remarkable Mako Shark Journey

A satellite reporting tagging device know as a SPOT tag, attached to a shortfin mako shark dubbed “Carol” in New Zealand five months ago, is providing scientists with remarkable and previously unknown details of the timing and long-distance migratory movements of this species.

makotag

See more on Sportfishing magazine.

How long before sharks are gone?

sharks-fin-market

The insatiable demand for Shark’s Fin Soup is forcing shark populations down to dangerously low levels, some species are nearing extinction and may never recover.

Take a look at this page and video, on taking meaningful action to protect the ancient creatures of the deep

http://www.pewenvironment.org/campaigns/global-shark-conservation/id/8589941059/?WT.srch=1&WT.mc_id=SM-Sharks-NZ

Rock Snot Cure-All – Not!

There is a growing trend in the USA for  various states to consider banning felt sole wading boots. A couple have already taken the plunge and of course anglers are exhibiting all the angst that hit new New Zealand fly-fishers when the ‘no felt soles’ regulation came into being.

Some US sites are promoting ‘Uncle Jacks Didymo Killer’ because various test have shown it to be a an excellent rock snot killer, on contact with didymo.

In fact some sites are suggesting Uncle Jacks is so good it will negate the need to ban felt soles. Unfortunately this is simply not the case. Uncle Jacks is a good and effective surface spray, and works well on any didymo that it makes contact with. But it is the contact bit that hides the problem.

Tests conducted here in New Zealand and elsewhere have shown conclusively that wading on infested rocks with felt soles forces the didymo ‘spores’ deep inside the felt, so deep, that no surface spray gets anywhere near it. The spores can live in damp felt for weeks. And it only needs a tiny number of the minute ‘spores’ to infest a river.

There are two ways to ensure didymo is killed in felt soles:

  • Dry them for at least 72 hours in a dry, warm environment.
  • Freeze the boots for at least 12 hours.

As to the rest of the wading gear, waders, boots, laces, boot tongues, wading staff, landing net, etc., anything that makes contact with the river – go mad with Uncle Jack’s or any other sprays that do the business, there are a number of them. They will deal to didymo – but in felt soles? Afraid not!

Brown plague: Didymo or “Rock Snot”

Here is an excellent article on the state of play of the Didymo problem in the South Island of New Zealand.

The sad part is that the situation in New Zealand is a graphic illustration of the ‘portability’ of all sorts of pests because of the comparative ease of travel. It is believed the introduction of Didymo in New Zealand was by way of an American angler, or returning Kiwi angler – the Didymo strain in New Zealand is the same as that found found in the USA.

Is there a hope of eradicating the pest – not in the foreseeable future, however there is growing evidence that Didymo does fluctuate with water levels and increased flows.

The good news is that the impact of Didymo on river life, especially the insects trout feed on, are not as badly impacted as first thought, but are actually thriving.

Securely handling trout without causing stress or damage

One of New Zealand’s best known guides, Tony Entwhistle, writing in the New Zealand Fish & Game Magazine, has one of the best descriptions I have read on the proper handling of a trout.

Securely handling a trout without causing stress or damage is a matter of a gentle touch, not a tight grip.

To pacify a landed trout, simply place a hand vertically in front of its nose to prevent it  from swimming  forward and fold the palm to cover both eyes. This acts as a mask and immediately calms it down. Trout relax quickly when their eyes are covered.

Next grasp the fish’s tail with the other hand, without excessive force. Some anglers use a piece of stocking for grip, but with good technique this isn’t necessary. Securing a trout needs only gentle pressure between the thumb and forefinger, applied directly over the base of the tail, applied where it joins the body (hypural joint).

Apply pressure top and bottom through the first joints of the forefinger and thumb, rather than along the sides. The mistake is grasping the tail too far forward and using too much hand in doing so. Squeezing hard does not help as the fish slips more easily.

Now test the grip by lifting the fish slightly by the tail, keeping the other hand over the eyes for the moment. If the grip is secure the trout will not slip, but if it does resist grabbing at it with both hands. By quickly slipping a hand in front of the nose, and covering the eyes again, a lot more fish will be saved from premature release.

With a positive grip on the tail it is now possible to begin lifting the trout safely for a photograph or release.

Avoid squeezing the fish around the soft belly area behind the pectoral fins because this causes discomfort and can potentially cause serious damage to internal organs. Instead slide the free hand under the pectoral fins, orientating the hand so that the trout’s head rests along the index finger, with the pectoral fins spread out between thumb and little finger.

The trout will be nicely balanced and the soft tissue in the belly area will no be supporting any weight. Lifting the trout this way, and returning it to the water between photographs minimizes any distress which could reignite its struggles. Turn the fish belly up when removing the hook.

Handle trout gently and with respect and they won’t panic or stress, ensuring their revival for release without damage and a minimum of fuss.”

© Reproduced by permission – ‘New Zealand Fish and Game Magazine’